Proposal Title

Do universities support multiple role women students?

Abstract

This paper presents findings of a study of adult women who carry both family and work roles while studying adult education and social work. Adult educators have always advocated on behalf of learners who occupy concurrent roles in the family, the work world and the community. Increased access combined with changing demographic and economic trends have resulted in a marked increase in the number of adult learners in universities. These changes challenge universities to re-examine their commitment to and support for adult learners at a time when the adult student group is becoming more diversified. Increasing numbers of adult learners in universities come from "new" clienteles, such as women with family responsibilities (Apps, 1988, Edwards, 1993). This raises the question as to whether traditional accommodations designed for working men meet the needs of specific groups. This paper presents results of a study of adult women who carry both family and paid work responsibilities while studying in two professional disciplines. This study focused on different actors’ perspectives on needs of these students and on university-based support.

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Jan 1st, 12:50 PM

Do universities support multiple role women students?

This paper presents findings of a study of adult women who carry both family and work roles while studying adult education and social work. Adult educators have always advocated on behalf of learners who occupy concurrent roles in the family, the work world and the community. Increased access combined with changing demographic and economic trends have resulted in a marked increase in the number of adult learners in universities. These changes challenge universities to re-examine their commitment to and support for adult learners at a time when the adult student group is becoming more diversified. Increasing numbers of adult learners in universities come from "new" clienteles, such as women with family responsibilities (Apps, 1988, Edwards, 1993). This raises the question as to whether traditional accommodations designed for working men meet the needs of specific groups. This paper presents results of a study of adult women who carry both family and paid work responsibilities while studying in two professional disciplines. This study focused on different actors’ perspectives on needs of these students and on university-based support.