Abstract

Mentoring relationships are socially constructed, and the power that mentors have and exercise within mentoring relationships can be helpful or hurtful to protégés. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to explore mentoring literature and models from the fields of adult education, general education, and human resource development, examining issues of power in mentoring within this literature. Ways of planning for and promoting mentoring programs that account for power differentials and enhance adult learning and development within mentoring are discussed.

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Oct 8th, 9:00 AM

Addressing Marginalization and Mentoring: Examining Power and Interests

Mentoring relationships are socially constructed, and the power that mentors have and exercise within mentoring relationships can be helpful or hurtful to protégés. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to explore mentoring literature and models from the fields of adult education, general education, and human resource development, examining issues of power in mentoring within this literature. Ways of planning for and promoting mentoring programs that account for power differentials and enhance adult learning and development within mentoring are discussed.