Abstract

This paper draws on the findings of recent national surveys of paid and unpaid work as well as formal and informal learning to assess the extent of correspondence between work and learning activities in Canada. The main conclusion is that workers’ learning efforts increasingly exceed the requirements of their paid jobs. We live in a knowledge-rich society but with relatively diminishing opportunities to apply this knowledge in our jobs.

Keywords

work and learning, underemployment

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Jun 10th, 4:40 PM

Probing the Icebergs of Workplace Learning: Findings of the 1998, 2004 and 2010 Surveys of Work and Lifelong Learning1

This paper draws on the findings of recent national surveys of paid and unpaid work as well as formal and informal learning to assess the extent of correspondence between work and learning activities in Canada. The main conclusion is that workers’ learning efforts increasingly exceed the requirements of their paid jobs. We live in a knowledge-rich society but with relatively diminishing opportunities to apply this knowledge in our jobs.