Abstract

The rangeland environment in southern Idaho has been heavily impacted by human activities. Invasion by exotic plant species, frequent fires, grazing pressure, and other ecological disturbances have greatly affected the structure and dynamics of grasshopper populations. Quantification of spatial patterns of grasshopper density and species composition is important in order to determine their influence on grassland ecosystems, as well as evaluating managerial decisions concerning vegetation manipulations, grazing practices, and spraying programs. A spatial statistical approach to modeling the heterogeneity of grasshopper populations is presented, and the impact of vegetation and grazing treatments on grasshopper density is investigated. Empirical applications are demonstrated with reference to repeated field surveys conducted over several years in south central Idaho.

Keywords

Spatial dependence, modeling, variogram, grasshoppers

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Apr 23rd, 1:00 PM

SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF GRASSHOPPER DENSITY AS INFLUENCED BY ANTHROPOGENIC HABITAT CHANGES

The rangeland environment in southern Idaho has been heavily impacted by human activities. Invasion by exotic plant species, frequent fires, grazing pressure, and other ecological disturbances have greatly affected the structure and dynamics of grasshopper populations. Quantification of spatial patterns of grasshopper density and species composition is important in order to determine their influence on grassland ecosystems, as well as evaluating managerial decisions concerning vegetation manipulations, grazing practices, and spraying programs. A spatial statistical approach to modeling the heterogeneity of grasshopper populations is presented, and the impact of vegetation and grazing treatments on grasshopper density is investigated. Empirical applications are demonstrated with reference to repeated field surveys conducted over several years in south central Idaho.