Author Information

J. R. Alldredge
F. L. Young

Abstract

A team of 14 scientists conducted a 6-year, 16-ha, integrated pest management field study in the dryland wheat production area of the Pacific Northwest. Objectives were to develop a profitable crop production system that controls weeds effectively and reduces soil erosion. Farm-size machinery was used to till, plant, and harvest crops grown in either a continuous wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) sequence or a 3-year crop rotation of winter wheat-spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) -spring pea (Pisum sativum L.) in conservation and conventional tillage systems. Main plot factor levels were two tillage systems and three rotation positions of winter wheat. Subplot factor levels were three weed management levels .

Issues in analysis oflong-term field studies are discussed. Multiple objectives and complexity of the design make analysis of these studies challenging. Results of one analysis of the data as a split plot analysis of variance averaged over years showed that conservation tillage systems for winter wheat met conservation compliance on highly erodible lands of the Pacific Northwest, reduced income risks, and lessened weather related fluctuations. Wheat yield was highest in the conservation tillage, 3-year crop rotation at maximum weed management level .

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Apr 23rd, 11:30 AM

ISSUES IN ANALYSIS OF A LONG-TERM INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FIELD STUDY

A team of 14 scientists conducted a 6-year, 16-ha, integrated pest management field study in the dryland wheat production area of the Pacific Northwest. Objectives were to develop a profitable crop production system that controls weeds effectively and reduces soil erosion. Farm-size machinery was used to till, plant, and harvest crops grown in either a continuous wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) sequence or a 3-year crop rotation of winter wheat-spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) -spring pea (Pisum sativum L.) in conservation and conventional tillage systems. Main plot factor levels were two tillage systems and three rotation positions of winter wheat. Subplot factor levels were three weed management levels .

Issues in analysis oflong-term field studies are discussed. Multiple objectives and complexity of the design make analysis of these studies challenging. Results of one analysis of the data as a split plot analysis of variance averaged over years showed that conservation tillage systems for winter wheat met conservation compliance on highly erodible lands of the Pacific Northwest, reduced income risks, and lessened weather related fluctuations. Wheat yield was highest in the conservation tillage, 3-year crop rotation at maximum weed management level .