Abstract

A basic undergraduate course in statistics is often not adequate for students in renewable natural resource programs such as wildlife, forestry, fisheries, and related subjects. A strong foundation in the basics of sampling in time and space of forest, vegetation, wildlife and fish populations is needed. A brief account of our experience in teaching such a course over the last three years along with progress on developing course-related material and activities is reported. This includes the development of: 1) computer-based simulations; 2) in-class participation simulations to illustrate the basic concepts of sampling in space and time; 3) exercises to introduce students to basic field sampling methods (quadrat, line and point sample units, mark/recapture, radio telemetry, etc.); and 4) an associated hypermedia text. From the beginning, emphasis is placed on cost-effectiveness and on the importance of sampling in the decision-making process. Students are required to develop their own sampling project, implement the project, present the results in an open forum, and prepare an associated report in the format of a scientific paper.

Keywords

Multimedia, simulations

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Apr 28th, 12:30 PM

A NEW APPROACH TO TEACHING NATURAL RESOURCE SAMPLING

A basic undergraduate course in statistics is often not adequate for students in renewable natural resource programs such as wildlife, forestry, fisheries, and related subjects. A strong foundation in the basics of sampling in time and space of forest, vegetation, wildlife and fish populations is needed. A brief account of our experience in teaching such a course over the last three years along with progress on developing course-related material and activities is reported. This includes the development of: 1) computer-based simulations; 2) in-class participation simulations to illustrate the basic concepts of sampling in space and time; 3) exercises to introduce students to basic field sampling methods (quadrat, line and point sample units, mark/recapture, radio telemetry, etc.); and 4) an associated hypermedia text. From the beginning, emphasis is placed on cost-effectiveness and on the importance of sampling in the decision-making process. Students are required to develop their own sampling project, implement the project, present the results in an open forum, and prepare an associated report in the format of a scientific paper.