Abstract

An individual-plant growth simulation model for quantifying competition between spring barley and wild oat has been previously described (price, Shafii, and Thill, 1994). Individual plants within a population were modeled independently and competition between plants was determined by resource demand within plant specific areas-of-influence. Calibration of the model to spring barley and wild oat biomass data was performed and shown to have a high degree of accuracy under mono culture conditions. The work presented here applies the specified model to a larger scale simulation for the purpose of demonstrating seed dispersal in wild oat. This is accomplished by breaking the annual cycle of wild oat seeds into the three integrated phases: Growth and development, dissemination, and dormancy. The growth and development phase is handled using the individual-plant growth model. The subsequent dispersal of seeds is described using two-dimensional stochastic processes. Finally, a life table analysis, based on predetermined transition probabilities, is used to establish the makeup of populations in the following season. A sensitivity analysis which examines various biological, ecological, and mechanical components over a 10 year period is carried out and the potential use in weed science education is demonstrated.

Keywords

Individual-based modeling, Plant competition, Seed dissemination, Simulation algorithm

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Apr 30th, 11:10 AM

DEVELOPMENT OF WILD OAT SEED DISPERSAL DISTRIBUTIONS USING AN INDIVIDUAL-PLANT GROWTH SIMULATION MODEL

An individual-plant growth simulation model for quantifying competition between spring barley and wild oat has been previously described (price, Shafii, and Thill, 1994). Individual plants within a population were modeled independently and competition between plants was determined by resource demand within plant specific areas-of-influence. Calibration of the model to spring barley and wild oat biomass data was performed and shown to have a high degree of accuracy under mono culture conditions. The work presented here applies the specified model to a larger scale simulation for the purpose of demonstrating seed dispersal in wild oat. This is accomplished by breaking the annual cycle of wild oat seeds into the three integrated phases: Growth and development, dissemination, and dormancy. The growth and development phase is handled using the individual-plant growth model. The subsequent dispersal of seeds is described using two-dimensional stochastic processes. Finally, a life table analysis, based on predetermined transition probabilities, is used to establish the makeup of populations in the following season. A sensitivity analysis which examines various biological, ecological, and mechanical components over a 10 year period is carried out and the potential use in weed science education is demonstrated.