Abstract

Corn yield and evapotranspiration (ET) data obtained from weighing lysimeters is accumulated from nine experiments over six years and used to estimate a response function. The quadratic response function of corn yield as a function of water use by the plants indicates that yield increases at a decreasing rate as ET increases. Extending the analysis to water application data by commercial producers in a thirteen county area in the Texas Panhandle provides a response function of yield as a function of water application to meet ET needs. The best estimate of the relationship is a quadratic function. The response function is transformed into a value function measuring the value of corn produced corresponding to different levels of water availability. The cost function is estimated in terms of the energy cost for irrigation. These value and cost functions are then used to determine the profit maximizing level of water application for various price levels for corn and natural gas.

Keywords

response function, water, natural gas, input use, optimization

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Apr 29th, 9:00 AM

A STATISTICAL MODEL USING REFERENCE EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND WEATHER DATA TO PREDICT THE ECONOMIC OPTIMAL IRRIGATION LEVEL FOR CORN PRODUCTION IN THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

Corn yield and evapotranspiration (ET) data obtained from weighing lysimeters is accumulated from nine experiments over six years and used to estimate a response function. The quadratic response function of corn yield as a function of water use by the plants indicates that yield increases at a decreasing rate as ET increases. Extending the analysis to water application data by commercial producers in a thirteen county area in the Texas Panhandle provides a response function of yield as a function of water application to meet ET needs. The best estimate of the relationship is a quadratic function. The response function is transformed into a value function measuring the value of corn produced corresponding to different levels of water availability. The cost function is estimated in terms of the energy cost for irrigation. These value and cost functions are then used to determine the profit maximizing level of water application for various price levels for corn and natural gas.