Author Information

M. Kerek
A. M. Parkhurst
T. L. Mader

Abstract

Processing and handling cattle require an expenditure of energy causing an elevation of body temperature, depending on the ambient conditions. More knowledge of body temperature, Tb, dynamics could lead to more specific recommendations of how far cattle can be moved without stress. The bi-Iogistic model has been used to describe the handling process. This model estimates several important biological parameters: rate of increase in Tb (rate of heat challenge), the maximum Tb (max Tb), time to reach maximum Tb (tmax) and recovery rate (rate of decrease in Tb). The objectives of this study are: to compare parameter estimates from the bi-Iogistic model with a segmented version of the model; to investigate the robustness of the model for different definitions of recovery; and, to check for hormetic behavior using switching functions.

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Apr 27th, 1:30 PM

USING THE BI-LOGISTIC MODEL TO ESTIMATE BODY TEMPERATURE IN FEEDLOT CATTLE

Processing and handling cattle require an expenditure of energy causing an elevation of body temperature, depending on the ambient conditions. More knowledge of body temperature, Tb, dynamics could lead to more specific recommendations of how far cattle can be moved without stress. The bi-Iogistic model has been used to describe the handling process. This model estimates several important biological parameters: rate of increase in Tb (rate of heat challenge), the maximum Tb (max Tb), time to reach maximum Tb (tmax) and recovery rate (rate of decrease in Tb). The objectives of this study are: to compare parameter estimates from the bi-Iogistic model with a segmented version of the model; to investigate the robustness of the model for different definitions of recovery; and, to check for hormetic behavior using switching functions.