Author Information

X. Li
A. M. Parkhurst
T. L. Mader

Abstract

Processing and handling cattle requires expenditure of energy causing an elevation of body temperature, depending on the ambient conditions. Therefore, caution should be exercised in moving cattle, especially during summer. More knowledge of the dynamics of body temperature, (Tb), could lead to specific recommendations on how far and under what conditions cattle can be moved before becoming thermally challenged. Data comes from feedlot trials conducted over four days. A bi-logistic mixed model of Tb is used to describe the effects of moving and handling on Tb. This model provides estimates for several important biological parameters describing the thermal challenge and recovery: the maximum Tb challenge, challenge rate constant (rate constant for increase in Tb), time to maximum rate of challenge (challenge inflection point), baseline for recovery, recovery rate constant (rate constant for decrease in Tb) and time to maximum recovery rate (recovery inflection point). Fitting a nonlinear mixed model with six parameters under extremely variable animal and environmental conditions is difficult especially when the treatment factor (distance) is introduced into the model. Additional difficulties in fitting the model arise as the experimental design increases in complexity from a CRD to a replicated Latin square. The objectives of this study are: to examine the bi-logistic model with distance as a treatment factor and estimate the relative efficiencies as the experimental design is simplified.

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Apr 19th, 3:00 PM

COMPARING EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS FOR A BI-LOGISTICAL MODEL USED TO ESTIMATE HEAT STRESS WHEN MOVING FEEDLOT CATTLE

Processing and handling cattle requires expenditure of energy causing an elevation of body temperature, depending on the ambient conditions. Therefore, caution should be exercised in moving cattle, especially during summer. More knowledge of the dynamics of body temperature, (Tb), could lead to specific recommendations on how far and under what conditions cattle can be moved before becoming thermally challenged. Data comes from feedlot trials conducted over four days. A bi-logistic mixed model of Tb is used to describe the effects of moving and handling on Tb. This model provides estimates for several important biological parameters describing the thermal challenge and recovery: the maximum Tb challenge, challenge rate constant (rate constant for increase in Tb), time to maximum rate of challenge (challenge inflection point), baseline for recovery, recovery rate constant (rate constant for decrease in Tb) and time to maximum recovery rate (recovery inflection point). Fitting a nonlinear mixed model with six parameters under extremely variable animal and environmental conditions is difficult especially when the treatment factor (distance) is introduced into the model. Additional difficulties in fitting the model arise as the experimental design increases in complexity from a CRD to a replicated Latin square. The objectives of this study are: to examine the bi-logistic model with distance as a treatment factor and estimate the relative efficiencies as the experimental design is simplified.