Author Information

Douglas Baumann
R. W. Doerge

Abstract

DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification known to affect gene expression, cellular differentiation, as well as phenotypes. Recent advancements in next-generation sequencing technologies have provided unparalleled insight into the location and function of DNA methylation in a variety of organisms. These data require vastly different statistical procedures than data from previous genomic-based technologies. We outline the biological and chemical processes involved in several approaches for gaining DNA methylation data. The implications of the differences between the approaches are discussed relative to the statistical methodology, and the use of genome annotation is explored for the purpose of improving the statistical power when testing for differential methylation.

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May 1st, 8:15 AM

ISSUES IN TESTING DNA METHYLATION USING NEXT-GENERATION SEQUENCING

DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification known to affect gene expression, cellular differentiation, as well as phenotypes. Recent advancements in next-generation sequencing technologies have provided unparalleled insight into the location and function of DNA methylation in a variety of organisms. These data require vastly different statistical procedures than data from previous genomic-based technologies. We outline the biological and chemical processes involved in several approaches for gaining DNA methylation data. The implications of the differences between the approaches are discussed relative to the statistical methodology, and the use of genome annotation is explored for the purpose of improving the statistical power when testing for differential methylation.