Abstract

Summer heat has already been identified as a major factor for cattle deaths in the feedlot. This study attempts to assess what other factors contribute to and/or influence cattle deaths. Identifying multiple factors that contribute to summer feedlot deaths could aid feedlot managers in implementation of mitigation strategies and minimize the loss of nearly finished cattle. Daily pen, cattle, and nutritional characteristics were recorded and included in this generalized linear mixed model analysis. Cattle data were obtained from cattle pens at a single location from July 1, 2010 to July 31, 2010. Hourly weather data were acquired from this feed yard while solar radiation was received from a neighboring town. Rather than using multiple weather variables, a single comprehensive climate index that summarizes several weather variables is used to capture the apparent feel of the weather. After reviewing the data, a statistical model is developed and odds ratios are computed for statistical inference. According to these odds ratios, cattle fed on severe west slopes had significantly higher odds of death than other types of slopes. Analysis of feed intake indicates pens consuming 16 pounds of feed per head or less during July 16 – 18 have higher odds of death than other consumption levels.

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May 1st, 9:00 AM

LOGISTIC REGRESSION ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO SUMMER FEEDLOT DEATHS

Summer heat has already been identified as a major factor for cattle deaths in the feedlot. This study attempts to assess what other factors contribute to and/or influence cattle deaths. Identifying multiple factors that contribute to summer feedlot deaths could aid feedlot managers in implementation of mitigation strategies and minimize the loss of nearly finished cattle. Daily pen, cattle, and nutritional characteristics were recorded and included in this generalized linear mixed model analysis. Cattle data were obtained from cattle pens at a single location from July 1, 2010 to July 31, 2010. Hourly weather data were acquired from this feed yard while solar radiation was received from a neighboring town. Rather than using multiple weather variables, a single comprehensive climate index that summarizes several weather variables is used to capture the apparent feel of the weather. After reviewing the data, a statistical model is developed and odds ratios are computed for statistical inference. According to these odds ratios, cattle fed on severe west slopes had significantly higher odds of death than other types of slopes. Analysis of feed intake indicates pens consuming 16 pounds of feed per head or less during July 16 – 18 have higher odds of death than other consumption levels.