Abstract

Diverse soils and varying weather conditions not only affect overall performance of hybrid maize in multi-environment field studies, but can also cause strong genotype by environment interactions (GEI). Modern maize breeding experiments utilize multilocation trials with augmented field designs to evaluate the performance of unreplicated test hybrids. Augmented designs are resource efficient; however, these designs do not efficiently quantify or test GEI variation in the test hybrids. New methods are being developed that use random regression models to incorporate multiple environmental effects into GEI models to increase their accuracy and predictive ability. Incorporation of varying weather and soil physical variables into these models can be used to determine the potential causal factors of GEI. The identification of causal factors can assist in developing clusters of locations where homogenous performance of hybrids can be expected. The utility of the proposed approach is demonstrated with a real data analysis.

Keywords

genotype by environment interaction, hybrid maize, multi-environment trial, augmented unreplicated design, environmental variables, random regression models

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Apr 29th, 8:30 AM

EVALUATION OF GENOTYPE BY ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS FROM UNREPLICATED MULTI-ENVIRONMENTAL TRIALS OF HYBRID MAIZE

Diverse soils and varying weather conditions not only affect overall performance of hybrid maize in multi-environment field studies, but can also cause strong genotype by environment interactions (GEI). Modern maize breeding experiments utilize multilocation trials with augmented field designs to evaluate the performance of unreplicated test hybrids. Augmented designs are resource efficient; however, these designs do not efficiently quantify or test GEI variation in the test hybrids. New methods are being developed that use random regression models to incorporate multiple environmental effects into GEI models to increase their accuracy and predictive ability. Incorporation of varying weather and soil physical variables into these models can be used to determine the potential causal factors of GEI. The identification of causal factors can assist in developing clusters of locations where homogenous performance of hybrids can be expected. The utility of the proposed approach is demonstrated with a real data analysis.