Author Information

Mark West
Guy Hallman

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to explore the extent of how dose-response models may be used to estimate extreme levels of efficacy for controlling insect pests and possibly other uses. Probit-9 mortality (99.9968% mortality) is a standard for treatment effectiveness in tephritid fruit fly research, and has been adopted by the United States Department of Agriculture for fruit flies and other pests. Data taken from the phytosanitary treatment (PT) literature are analyzed. These data are used to fit dose-response models with logit, probit and complimentary log-log links. The effectiveness of these models for predicting extreme levels of efficacy is compared using large (~100,000+ individuals) confirmatory trials that are also reported in the PT literature. We examine the role of model goodnessof- fit as a requirement for obtaining reliable dose requirements.

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Apr 28th, 3:30 PM

ESTIMATION OF DOSE REQUIREMENTS FOR EXTREME LEVELS OF EFFICACY

The objective of this paper is to explore the extent of how dose-response models may be used to estimate extreme levels of efficacy for controlling insect pests and possibly other uses. Probit-9 mortality (99.9968% mortality) is a standard for treatment effectiveness in tephritid fruit fly research, and has been adopted by the United States Department of Agriculture for fruit flies and other pests. Data taken from the phytosanitary treatment (PT) literature are analyzed. These data are used to fit dose-response models with logit, probit and complimentary log-log links. The effectiveness of these models for predicting extreme levels of efficacy is compared using large (~100,000+ individuals) confirmatory trials that are also reported in the PT literature. We examine the role of model goodnessof- fit as a requirement for obtaining reliable dose requirements.