Abstract

Land Use and Land Cover Change (LULCC) influence the climate at a global and local scale. Using long term microclimate data (2002-2009, 2011-2012) from the Carbon Sequestration Project (CSP), Mead, NE, this study examines how crop selection and water management can mitigate heat in the atmosphere. Mitigation of global warming is dependent on the management of crop lands, and the amount and timing of rainfall during the growing season. Rainfed crops were found to heat the passing air. The irrigated maize crop was able to mitigate 20 to 62% of the sensible heat (H) compared to the rainfed maize counterpart, the lower value for wet years and the larger value for dry years. Soybeans under irrigation, on the other hand, extracted a maximum of 37% of cumulated H in comparison to rainfed soybean. The irrigated maize field can reduce the warming by as much as 76% compared to the rainfed soybean crop. In addition to increasing yields, irrigation of maize greatly reduces the heating of air, thus moderating regional climate in east central Nebraska.

Keywords

evapotranspiration, crop sensitivity, corn, maize, irrigation, climate change, mitigation

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IRRIGATED AND RAINFED CROPS Zea mays L. (MAIZE) AND Glycine max (SOYBEAN) ACTING AS A SOURCE OR SINK FOR ATMOSPHERIC WARMING AT MEAD, NEBRASKA

Land Use and Land Cover Change (LULCC) influence the climate at a global and local scale. Using long term microclimate data (2002-2009, 2011-2012) from the Carbon Sequestration Project (CSP), Mead, NE, this study examines how crop selection and water management can mitigate heat in the atmosphere. Mitigation of global warming is dependent on the management of crop lands, and the amount and timing of rainfall during the growing season. Rainfed crops were found to heat the passing air. The irrigated maize crop was able to mitigate 20 to 62% of the sensible heat (H) compared to the rainfed maize counterpart, the lower value for wet years and the larger value for dry years. Soybeans under irrigation, on the other hand, extracted a maximum of 37% of cumulated H in comparison to rainfed soybean. The irrigated maize field can reduce the warming by as much as 76% compared to the rainfed soybean crop. In addition to increasing yields, irrigation of maize greatly reduces the heating of air, thus moderating regional climate in east central Nebraska.