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Authors

Colin Fleming

Abstract

The University of Stirling, one of four universities established in Scotland in the 1960s, was the only new foundation; the other three were raised to university status from pre-existing institutions. Unlike the other three—Dundee, Heriot-Watt and Strathclyde—Stirling had no established programmes of study around which to develop a system of academical dress. This helps to explain why Stirling was unique among the Scottish 1960s foundations in not adopting a faculty colour scheme. Rather, the system of academical dress was allowed to evolve with the University itself. This has led to a few anomalies but no more than those at other, more venerable, institutions. When designing its own academical dress, the University drew on a number of themes and traditions in Scottish universities’ academical dress: the use of Edinburgh shaped hoods for most graduates; the design of the gown for the honorary degree of Doctor of the University is based on a Glasgow gown; and the use of a masters’-style gown for all graduates,other than for Doctors of the University. Unlike all the other Scottish universities established in the 1960s as well as the ancient foundations, Stirling does not require the use of head gear (except by the Chancellor and Principal and Vice-Chancellor). In one area it has broken with tradition: it uses fur on its masters’ hoods, but this departure is not as significant as it might seem at first.

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