2016: Day of Learning on Food Security

Keywords

food access, food deserts, maps, mapping

Description

This research seeks to better describe and understand rural and urban food deserts. Previous research on food deserts suggests that, as a result of discriminating structural social mechanisms like redlining and neighborhood disinvestment within large metro areas in the U.S., poor and black individuals and households tend to be at a distinct advantage in terms of healthy food accessibility and availability (Miller et al. 2015). Similar trends in grocery store disinvestment have been seen in rural areas though there has been less research attention in these areas. In this paper we analyze the differences and similarities between the dynamics that determine healthy food accessibility and availability in a small urban and isolated rural context in Kansas, in Topeka (urban) and Gove, Linn, and Pottawatomie counties (rural). Data from the 2010 U.S. Census and the 2006-2010 American Community Survey estimates and independently collected data on food store locations are used to inform a descriptive quantitative analysis that uses GIS mapping.

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Apr 4th, 9:10 AM

Food Deserts in the Breadbasket: A Rural-Urban Comparison

This research seeks to better describe and understand rural and urban food deserts. Previous research on food deserts suggests that, as a result of discriminating structural social mechanisms like redlining and neighborhood disinvestment within large metro areas in the U.S., poor and black individuals and households tend to be at a distinct advantage in terms of healthy food accessibility and availability (Miller et al. 2015). Similar trends in grocery store disinvestment have been seen in rural areas though there has been less research attention in these areas. In this paper we analyze the differences and similarities between the dynamics that determine healthy food accessibility and availability in a small urban and isolated rural context in Kansas, in Topeka (urban) and Gove, Linn, and Pottawatomie counties (rural). Data from the 2010 U.S. Census and the 2006-2010 American Community Survey estimates and independently collected data on food store locations are used to inform a descriptive quantitative analysis that uses GIS mapping.