Streaming Media

Abstract

The University of North Texas Scholarly Works collections functions as our institution’s open access repository. This summer, we conducted a preliminary analysis of the collection’s holdings to assess our progress in archiving UNT faculty research in support of our Open Access and Long-term Digital Stewardship policy as passed in 2012. As we do not subscribe to any current research information systems (CRIS), this analysis took the form of a census using current faculty senate data to understand who is and is not contributing to the repository. After looking at our contribution population, we also examined what resource types are contributed to the repository to further leverage those relationships between contributor and resource type. As of August 2016, the UNT Scholarly Works collection contains work from 25% of our current, active faculty members. Although the collection is populated through mediated deposit, this analysis revealed trends for likelihood of contribution to the collection.

In looking at these trends, we understand that disciplinary differences exist in terms of support (or not-supporting) open access, particularly as the type of desired scholarly output and its ability to be archived within the repository can change between disciplines. However, the main bottleneck in developing this collection lies in increasing both the number of contributors and the number of items contributed from the UNT community. By identifying contributing and non-contributing faculty, and by drawing attention to their contributed resource types, we can more accurately understand how to perform outreach for the collection. In this presentation we’ll discuss the results of our preliminary analysis of faculty contributions, and our subsequent outreach plan to double our collection’s holdings as well as our contributors.

Type of Proposal

Presentation

Proposal Category

Outreach and Marketing

Keywords

institutional repository, outreach and marketing, outreach

Learning Outcomes

Attendees will learn a method for evaluating an institutional repository's success, and how to develop a data-driven outreach plan.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

 
Nov 16th, 2:00 PM Nov 16th, 2:45 PM

Developing an Outreach Plan for UNT Scholarly Works

The University of North Texas Scholarly Works collections functions as our institution’s open access repository. This summer, we conducted a preliminary analysis of the collection’s holdings to assess our progress in archiving UNT faculty research in support of our Open Access and Long-term Digital Stewardship policy as passed in 2012. As we do not subscribe to any current research information systems (CRIS), this analysis took the form of a census using current faculty senate data to understand who is and is not contributing to the repository. After looking at our contribution population, we also examined what resource types are contributed to the repository to further leverage those relationships between contributor and resource type. As of August 2016, the UNT Scholarly Works collection contains work from 25% of our current, active faculty members. Although the collection is populated through mediated deposit, this analysis revealed trends for likelihood of contribution to the collection.

In looking at these trends, we understand that disciplinary differences exist in terms of support (or not-supporting) open access, particularly as the type of desired scholarly output and its ability to be archived within the repository can change between disciplines. However, the main bottleneck in developing this collection lies in increasing both the number of contributors and the number of items contributed from the UNT community. By identifying contributing and non-contributing faculty, and by drawing attention to their contributed resource types, we can more accurately understand how to perform outreach for the collection. In this presentation we’ll discuss the results of our preliminary analysis of faculty contributions, and our subsequent outreach plan to double our collection’s holdings as well as our contributors.