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Keywords

crabgrass, bermudagrass, stocker cattle, grazing, tall fescue, endophyte, wheat

Abstract

A total of 360 mixed black yearling steers were used to compare grazing and subsequent finishing performance from pastures with ‘MaxQ’ tall fescue, a wheat-bermudagrass double-crop system, or a wheat-crabgrass double-crop system in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018. Daily gains of steers that grazed MaxQ fescue, wheat-bermudagrass, or wheat-crabgrass were similar (P > 0.05) in 2010, 2016, 2017, and 2018. Daily gains of steers that grazed wheat-bermudagrass or wheat-crabgrass were greater (P > 0.05) than those that grazed MaxQ fescue in 2011 and 2012. Daily gains of steers that grazed wheat-crabgrass were greater (P > 0.05) than those that grazed wheat-bermudagrass and similar (P > 0.05) to those that grazed MaxQ fescue in 2013. Daily gains of steers that grazed wheat-crabgrass were greater (P > 0.05) than those that grazed wheat-bermudagrass or MaxQ fescue in 2014. In 2015, daily gains of steers that grazed wheat-crabgrass were greater (P < 0.05) than those that grazed wheat-bermudagrass or MaxQ fescue and daily gain of steers grazing wheat-bermudagrass was greater (P < 0.05) than that of those that grazed MaxQ fescue. Finishing gains were similar (P > 0.05) among forage systems in 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2016. Finishing gains of steers that grazed MaxQ fescue were greater (P < 0.05) than those that grazed wheatbermudagrass in 2011 and greater (P < 0.05) than those that grazed wheat-bermudagrass or wheat-crabgrass in 2015. In 2017, finishing gains of steers that grazed wheatcrabgrass were greater (P < 0.05) than those that grazed MaxQ fescue.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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