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Keywords

Organized Veterinary Medicine, Rural Veterinary Practice, Externship Program, Training Program

Abstract

In 2000, a group of dedicated rural veterinarians met while taking the Beef Cattle Production Management Course at the Great Plains Veterinary Education Center at Clay Center, NE. Upon finding an a common belief in the value of rural practice, this group began visiting each other's practices and offered critiques about ways that the practice could work more efficiently. One thing became almost immediately noticeable through these visits-the challenge of finding qualified associates interested in joining a rural practice.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

References

1. News stories concerning the rural veterinarian shortage appeared in a wide range of media across the United States, including such headlines as “Vet shortage threatens food system” (USA Today, 28 February 2003) and “A New Problem for Farmers: Few Veterinarians” (The New York Times, 2 February 2007).

2. Victoria G. Myers, “Animal Health Care in Crisis,” The Progressive Farmer, September 2009, p. 33.

3. Victoria G. Myers, “Animal Health Care in Crisis,” The Progressive Farmer, September 2009, p. 33.

4. Paul Click, DVM, interview by authors, Vernon, AL, 16 March 2010.

5. Academy of Rural Veterinarians, School Visit Survey Compilation for Membership Year 2009, February 2010.

6. Dean Christianson, DVM, interview by authors, Ashley, ND, 16 March 2010.

7. Aurora Villarroel, DVM, MPVM, PhD; Stephen McDonald, DVM; William Walker, DVM; Lana Kaiser, MD, DVM; Renee Dewell, DVM, MS; Frant Dewell, DVM, PhD, “A survey of reasons why veterinarians enter rural practice in the United States,” JAVMA, Vol 236, No. 8, 15 April 2010, p.849-857.
http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.236.8.849
PMid:20392180

8. “Working with a nationally known association management firm allowed ARV to establish a national office that now takes care of our daily operation. This allowed our very dedicated Board Members to focus on the future of ARV and the critical issues facing our profession states ARV Past President Dr. Rexanne Struve of Iowa. Rexanne Struve, DVM, interview by authors, notes, Manning, IA, 17 March 2010.

9. Aurora Villarroel, DVM, MPVM, PhD; Stephen McDonald, DVM; William Walker, DVM; Lana Kaiser, MD, DVM; Renee Dewell, DVM, MS; Frant Dewell, DVM, PhD, “A survey of reasons why veterinarians enter rural practice in the United States,” JAVMA, Vol 236, No. 8, 15 April 2010, p.849-857.
http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.236.8.849
PMid:20392180

10. Christina Macejko, “Changes in Agriculture Place New Demands on Rural Veterinarians,” DVM Newsmagazine, April 2009.

11. Jennifer Walker, DVM, “Food Animal Medicine in Crisis,” JAVMA, Vol 235, No. 4, 15 August 2009, p. 370-371.

12. “The first years of practice offer challenges for anyone, and in a rural setting it is important to know that we can still be available for each other, especially for the new graduate facing personal and professional dilemmas. ARV is a valuable resource for new practice owners in rural areas. We are currently building a network of recent graduates and new practice owners to help with the day to day challenges of running your own practice. It is through this network that we will offer help with business planning, SBA loans, and other important topic.” said Dr. Lisa A. Willis of Texas. Lisa A. Willis, DVM, interview by authors, Gustine, TX, 15 March 2010.

13. Brett Andrews, DVM, interview by authors, Burwell, NE, 17 March 2010.

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