Title

Mechanisms for the Effect of Strawberry Consumption on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

Presenter Information

Monica RomeroFollow

Student Major/Year in School

Nutritional Sciences, second year

Faculty Mentor Information

Sara K. Rosenkranz, Ph.D., Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics & Health, College of Human Ecology

Abstract

Research indicates that fruit berries reduce cardiovascular risk because of their bioactive compounds, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory agents. Potential mechanisms for these protective effects include reductions in oxidative stress and inflammation. The primary purpose of the current study is to determine the effects of different doses of strawberry consumption on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and markers of inflammation. Forty-eight overweight/obese (BMI: 25.0–34.9kg/m2) individuals between the ages of 35–75yrs, will be recruited to a 16-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Once recruited, participants will undergo a 10-day washout where no berries are consumed. Participants will be randomized to begin consuming one of three different doses of strawberry powder for a period of 4-weeks. Following completion of the initial dose, participants will crossover to the second and third doses in random order. Doses are 1) 39g of active powder equal to three servings of strawberries, 2) 13g of active powder with 26g of control powder equal to one serving of strawberries, and 3) 39g of control powder. Oxidized LDL and markers of inflammation including high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), will be assessed before and after each 4-week period. Oxidized LDL will be also be assessed following consumption of a mixed meal tolerance test (MTT). Results will include the determination of effects of different doses of strawberry consumption on ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and IL-6 as well as associations between these markers and more traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Results are expected to show that strawberry consumption leads to reductions in ox-LDL and markers of inflammation in a dose-response manner. These results will contribute to the understanding of potential mechanisms behind reductions in cardiovascular risk attributed to strawberry consumption, in adults who have high risk for cardio-metabolic disease.

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Mechanisms for the Effect of Strawberry Consumption on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

Research indicates that fruit berries reduce cardiovascular risk because of their bioactive compounds, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory agents. Potential mechanisms for these protective effects include reductions in oxidative stress and inflammation. The primary purpose of the current study is to determine the effects of different doses of strawberry consumption on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and markers of inflammation. Forty-eight overweight/obese (BMI: 25.0–34.9kg/m2) individuals between the ages of 35–75yrs, will be recruited to a 16-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Once recruited, participants will undergo a 10-day washout where no berries are consumed. Participants will be randomized to begin consuming one of three different doses of strawberry powder for a period of 4-weeks. Following completion of the initial dose, participants will crossover to the second and third doses in random order. Doses are 1) 39g of active powder equal to three servings of strawberries, 2) 13g of active powder with 26g of control powder equal to one serving of strawberries, and 3) 39g of control powder. Oxidized LDL and markers of inflammation including high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), will be assessed before and after each 4-week period. Oxidized LDL will be also be assessed following consumption of a mixed meal tolerance test (MTT). Results will include the determination of effects of different doses of strawberry consumption on ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and IL-6 as well as associations between these markers and more traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Results are expected to show that strawberry consumption leads to reductions in ox-LDL and markers of inflammation in a dose-response manner. These results will contribute to the understanding of potential mechanisms behind reductions in cardiovascular risk attributed to strawberry consumption, in adults who have high risk for cardio-metabolic disease.