Abstract

I examine learning as part of the process where immigrants negotiate personal and profession identities and participate in the Canadian labour market. I argue for a mutually-constitutive relationship between individual practices, identity construction and Canadian workplace accessibility and receptivity underpinned by gender, race and class relations and perceived language differences.

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Nov 14th, 9:00 AM

Practices on the Periphery: Highly Educated Chinese Immigrant Women Making Occupational Niches in Canada

I examine learning as part of the process where immigrants negotiate personal and profession identities and participate in the Canadian labour market. I argue for a mutually-constitutive relationship between individual practices, identity construction and Canadian workplace accessibility and receptivity underpinned by gender, race and class relations and perceived language differences.