Abstract

Plant competition models traditionally have used population or stand level parameters as a basis for modeling. While such models may be valid with regard to average responses, they fail to account for important factors such as within stand variability and spatial relationships. This translates to an assumption of uniformity in growth characteristics among individual plant,S as well as an equidistant spacing arrangement which are unlikely in real populations. One alternative is to model the growth characteristics of individual plants separately which, when combined as a system, will inherently have popUlation attributes related to competition. Competition models of this type allow for various combinations of growth patterns and spatial arrangements. An individual-plant based simulation model is introduced and the relationships of model parameters with existing concepts in plant competition are discussed. Models are calibrated to wild oat (Avenafatua) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) using data from replicated field experiments in Northern Idaho.

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Apr 24th, 8:10 AM

AN INDIVIDUAL-PLANT GROWTH SIMULATION MODEL FOR QUANTIFYING PLANT COMPETITION

Plant competition models traditionally have used population or stand level parameters as a basis for modeling. While such models may be valid with regard to average responses, they fail to account for important factors such as within stand variability and spatial relationships. This translates to an assumption of uniformity in growth characteristics among individual plant,S as well as an equidistant spacing arrangement which are unlikely in real populations. One alternative is to model the growth characteristics of individual plants separately which, when combined as a system, will inherently have popUlation attributes related to competition. Competition models of this type allow for various combinations of growth patterns and spatial arrangements. An individual-plant based simulation model is introduced and the relationships of model parameters with existing concepts in plant competition are discussed. Models are calibrated to wild oat (Avenafatua) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) using data from replicated field experiments in Northern Idaho.