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Dan Nettleton

Abstract

This paper provides a brief introduction to the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL). An example on mapping QTL for root thickness in rice is presented to illustrate popular statistical methods used in QTL mapping. Interval mapping is used in conjunction with permutation testing techniques to detect significant associations between genetic positions and quantitative traits while controlling overall type I error rate. A review of a recent technique that can greatly reduce the computational expense of permutation testing in QTL mapping is discussed. Theory is provided for an extension of recent results that may lead to more powerful methods of QTL mapping through permutation testing.

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Apr 25th, 1:00 PM

A COMPUTATIONALLY EFFICIENT METHOD FOR DETERMINING SIGNIFICANCE IN INTERVAL MAPPING OF QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI

This paper provides a brief introduction to the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL). An example on mapping QTL for root thickness in rice is presented to illustrate popular statistical methods used in QTL mapping. Interval mapping is used in conjunction with permutation testing techniques to detect significant associations between genetic positions and quantitative traits while controlling overall type I error rate. A review of a recent technique that can greatly reduce the computational expense of permutation testing in QTL mapping is discussed. Theory is provided for an extension of recent results that may lead to more powerful methods of QTL mapping through permutation testing.