Author Information

Bahman Shafii
William J. Price

Abstract

The degree of agreement between classification and ground truth in remotely sensed data is often quantified with an error matrix and summarized using agreement measures such as Cohen's kappa. In the case of ground truth however, the kappa statistic can be shown to be a transformation of the marginal proportions commonly referred to as omissional and commissional error rates. A more meaningful statistical interpretation of remote sensing results and less ambiguous conclusions can be obtained via direct utilization of these measures. Several estimation techniques have been suggested for these marginal proportions. In this study, we will develop the exact binomial, bootstrap and Bayesian estimation methods for omissional and commissional errors. Emphasis will be placed on comparing the various estimation methods and their corresponding empirical distributions. Results are demonstrated with reference to a study designed to evaluate the detectability of yellow hawkweed and oxeye daisy using multispectral digital imagery in Northern Idaho.

Keywords

Agreement Measures, Omissional and Commissional Error rates, Remote Sensing

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Apr 29th, 10:30 AM

COMPARING BINOMIAL BOOTSTRAP AND BAYESIAN ESTIMATION METHODS IN ASSESSING THE AGREEMENT BETWEEN CLASSIFIED IMAGES AND GROUND TRUTH DATA.

The degree of agreement between classification and ground truth in remotely sensed data is often quantified with an error matrix and summarized using agreement measures such as Cohen's kappa. In the case of ground truth however, the kappa statistic can be shown to be a transformation of the marginal proportions commonly referred to as omissional and commissional error rates. A more meaningful statistical interpretation of remote sensing results and less ambiguous conclusions can be obtained via direct utilization of these measures. Several estimation techniques have been suggested for these marginal proportions. In this study, we will develop the exact binomial, bootstrap and Bayesian estimation methods for omissional and commissional errors. Emphasis will be placed on comparing the various estimation methods and their corresponding empirical distributions. Results are demonstrated with reference to a study designed to evaluate the detectability of yellow hawkweed and oxeye daisy using multispectral digital imagery in Northern Idaho.