Abstract

The time period and position which make the major contribution to total yield and to its variation is important for the field management and breeding for upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum, L. Two-year end-of-season plant mapping data from 11 upland cotton cultivars were analyzed by position and by week. The data showed that the first position in the second and third weeks made the largest contribution to the total boll number and lint yield. The eleven cultivars differed with respect to the earliness but they had similar lint yield at harvest. The early season cultivars produce more yield and more bolls than late season cultivars in the first week of blooming, while the late season cultivars produce more yield and more bolls in the fourth week and later. The genotypic variance was the largest in week 5 and later for both lint yield and boll number. Thus, these results suggested that appropriate field management is required to maintain high yield in weeks 2 and 3 and to obtain maximum yield at late season, especially for late season cultivars. Breeders could be able to cross two cultivars which differ in earliness to obtain high yielding lines.

Keywords

upland cotton; position; yield distribution; boll distribution

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Apr 25th, 6:00 PM

DISTRIBUTION OF BOLL NUMBER AND LINT YIELD BY TIME AND POSITION IN UPLAND COTTON CULTIVATORS

The time period and position which make the major contribution to total yield and to its variation is important for the field management and breeding for upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum, L. Two-year end-of-season plant mapping data from 11 upland cotton cultivars were analyzed by position and by week. The data showed that the first position in the second and third weeks made the largest contribution to the total boll number and lint yield. The eleven cultivars differed with respect to the earliness but they had similar lint yield at harvest. The early season cultivars produce more yield and more bolls than late season cultivars in the first week of blooming, while the late season cultivars produce more yield and more bolls in the fourth week and later. The genotypic variance was the largest in week 5 and later for both lint yield and boll number. Thus, these results suggested that appropriate field management is required to maintain high yield in weeks 2 and 3 and to obtain maximum yield at late season, especially for late season cultivars. Breeders could be able to cross two cultivars which differ in earliness to obtain high yielding lines.