Abstract

The field of adult education has steadily grown over the past 60 years to recognize the importance of lifelong learning as essential to health and mental wellbeing (UNESCO). Furthermore, the prosperity associated with both formal and informal educational activity extends well beyond the realm of the learner to those within familial, professional and cultural circles. Less apparent is the notion that persons with Alzheimer’s disease, particularly those who strive to adapt to progressive cognitive decline, remain learners who benefit from formal and informal educational opportunities. While contemplating procedural, cognitive and affective realms of learning, the author examines the impact of dynamic educational experiences upon individuals with dementia.

Keywords

Alzheimer’s disease, adult education, well-being

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Jun 10th, 10:30 AM

Reciprocity and Influence: exploring dimensions of learning in people with Alzheimer’s disease

The field of adult education has steadily grown over the past 60 years to recognize the importance of lifelong learning as essential to health and mental wellbeing (UNESCO). Furthermore, the prosperity associated with both formal and informal educational activity extends well beyond the realm of the learner to those within familial, professional and cultural circles. Less apparent is the notion that persons with Alzheimer’s disease, particularly those who strive to adapt to progressive cognitive decline, remain learners who benefit from formal and informal educational opportunities. While contemplating procedural, cognitive and affective realms of learning, the author examines the impact of dynamic educational experiences upon individuals with dementia.