Author Information

Stephen R. Lowry

Is the first presenter a student?

No

Type of Submission

Paper/Presentation

Abstract

The objective of many dairy nutrition experiments is to determine the effect of certain dietary treatments on milk production and quality responses. However, milk responses are quite variable and cows (experimental units) are expensive and have substantial maintenance costs. This manuscript reviews principles for planning to obtain good data relevant to the hypothesis, experimental design to control inherent variation, and interpreted analyses to facilitate understanding of dairy relationships. Emphasis is placed on assurance that milk response differences due to dietary treatments will have a high probability of being detected as significant. Guidelines addressing these principles along with suggested computer programs are presented. Results of two dairy nutrition experiments are included to illustrate use of the presented guidelines to maximize detection of real differences in milk response due to dietary treatments.

Keywords

Experimental Design, Dairy

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Apr 30th, 10:30 AM

STATISTICAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF DAIRY NUTRITION EXPERIMENTS TO IMPROVE DETECTION OF MILK RESPONSE DIFFERENCES

The objective of many dairy nutrition experiments is to determine the effect of certain dietary treatments on milk production and quality responses. However, milk responses are quite variable and cows (experimental units) are expensive and have substantial maintenance costs. This manuscript reviews principles for planning to obtain good data relevant to the hypothesis, experimental design to control inherent variation, and interpreted analyses to facilitate understanding of dairy relationships. Emphasis is placed on assurance that milk response differences due to dietary treatments will have a high probability of being detected as significant. Guidelines addressing these principles along with suggested computer programs are presented. Results of two dairy nutrition experiments are included to illustrate use of the presented guidelines to maximize detection of real differences in milk response due to dietary treatments.